Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard

By: Jim Bruce
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Chip and Dan Heath, authors of “Made to Stick,” released a new book in February – “Switch:  How to change things when change is hard.”  Today’s reading is a review of the book by Keith McFarland which appeared in BusinessWeek. McFarland is founder of McFarland Strategy Partners and author of The Breakthrough Company, and BOUNCE.

In Switch, the Heath brothers take on the subject of organizational change.  And, according to McFarland they make the often dry subject “suddenly relevant for anyone trying to get a bunch of people to change directions.”

The Real Cause of BP’s Oil Spill

By: Jim Bruce
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After my June 1st Tuesday Reading “Drilling for Certainty” – which made the point that our world has become extremely technologically complex and that the possibility for catastrophe is imbedded in the fabric of day-to-day live – I received several emails making the same or similar points.

Winning and Losing

By: Jim Bruce
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A couple of months ago, Gary Augustson posted a BLOG at the Leaders Community Site which has a powerful message for all of us:  “Life is full of ‘wins’ and ‘losses’."  In the end, how you deal with both will be one of the keys to your success as a leader.”  Given the importance of what Gary says, I’ve included the entire post below as this week’s reading.

 .  .  .  .  .     jim

Overcome Resistance With The Right Questions

By: Jim Bruce
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No matter who we are, we will meet resistance on some matter every day.  And, according to Kevin Daley, founder of Communispond, Inc. and author of “Talk Your Way to the Top” and “Socratic Selling,” the way we handle that resistance is often counterproductive.

In “Overcome Resistance with the Right Questions”, Daley notes that our default response to resistance is more selling.  When we meet resistance, we roll out more evidence to support the idea.  And, still we hear “no.”

Drilling for Certainty

By: Jim Bruce
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David Brooks’ May 27, 2010 Op-Ed piece in the New York Times was titled “Drilling for Certainity”which is today’s Tuesday Reading.  The piece also appeared in the May 29th Pittsburgh Post Gazette and was seen by Annie Stunden, Former CIO, University of Wisconsin and IT Leaders Presenter and Coach.  

Communicating Vision

By: Jim Bruce
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This Tuesday’s reading is “Communicating Vision”, by John Maxwell, prolific writer and speaker on leadership.

In this short article, Maxwell outlines an approach for communicating a clear and compelling organizational vision.  (You will notice many similarities to the SUCCES tool that we have presented in many of the MOR leadership program workshops.)

He makes six recommendations:

The Mark of a Great Leader

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s reading is Marshall Goldsmith’s article “The Mark of a Great Leader.”  In the article, Goldsmith says that the key trait of today’s leader is self-awareness.  He goes on to say that self-awareness entails “having a heightened understanding of one’s own behavior, motivators, and competencies – and having ‘emotional intelligence’ – to monitor and manage one’s emotional responses in a variety of situations.”

Is Your Leadership Developing or Diminishing?

By: Jim Bruce
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A few weeks ago Angela Bell from the University of Iowa shared Dan Bobinski’s article “Is your leadership developing or diminishing?” with her cohort and now I’d like to share it with everyone.

As Bobinski, a training specialist, author, and president of Associates at Leadership Development, indicates, too many leaders easily get caught up in the immediate and forget, or neglect, the important.  

Back from a vacation?

By: Jim Bruce
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In today’s reading “Back from a vacation?”, David Rock, founder of the NeuroLeadership Institute and CDO of Results Coaching Systems, reports on research indicating that we are more likely to solve really difficult problems when we have a fresh or quiet mind.  Specifically the research points out that when faced with a new problem we apply strategies that worked in prior experiences.  This works well if the new problem is similar to an old one, but is far less likely to work if there is little relationship between the two problems.  What happens is that th

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