Alone Together

By: Jim Bruce
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Sherry Turkle, the Abby Rockefeller Mauze Professor of the Social Studies of Science and Technology at MIT, has a new book, “Alone Together.”  In the book, Turkle raises an interesting point about how we get and maintain each other’s attention in our always-on-connectivity culture.  

Go Broad Before You Go Deep

By: Jim Bruce
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Have you ever been in a meeting to make a decision and before the context can be outlined, a few meeting participants have taken over and are going deeper and deeper into a solution based on a suggestion of one of the individuals?  Today’s reading, ”Go Broad Before You Go Deep,“ from Roger Schwarz’s Fundamental Change Newsletter and found below, considers just that issue.

Learning to be a Clutch’ Leader

By: Jim Bruce
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In the sports world, a “clutch” player performs best when the pressure is on.  [See “Learning to be a ‘Clutch’ Leader” by Sean Silverstone, editor of HBS’s Working Knowledge newsletter.]  In the thinking of Paul Sullivan, New York Times business columnist and author of “Clutch:  Why Some People Excel Under Pressure and Others Don’t,”  the best example of a “clutch” person is the military leader – someone trained to make combat decisions with life or death consequences.  [See, “How Cadets Learn to be ‘Clutch’,”.]

Dawn of a New Day

By: Jim Bruce
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Ray Ozzie, chief software architect at Microsoft and previously a key figure at Software Arts and at Lotus, and founder of Groove, is leaving Microsoft after a short transition period.  Shortly after he made his announcement, Ozzie wrote “Dawn of a New Day,” as an email to Microsoft’s Executive Staff and his direct reports.  He also posted it at <http://ozzie.net/docs/dawn-of-a-new-day/>.  I believe that this piece is a “must-read” for everyone who is, or who aspires to be, a university IT leader.  Ozzie has a good track record at

Confidence is a Learnable Skill

By: Jim Bruce
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Some people seem to be born full of confidence, while others have difficulty speaking up about their ideas.  Is confidence, then, something you are born with and therefore that those of us less gifted, just have to muddle through?

How to Handle Surprise Criticism

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s Reading, “How to Handle Surprise Criticism”, focuses on feedback that comes as a surprise, even as a shock, from out of nowhere, about an issue you haven’t even perceived.

In this piece, Peter Bergman, speaker, writer, and consultant on leadership, says that to take such surprise criticism productively, you need a game plan.  He goes on to say that as you listen and your adrenaline begins to flow, you need to pause, take a deep breath, and:

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