Talent Management

Managing Yourself: Stop Holding Yourself Back

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s reading is “Managing Yourself:  Stop Holding Yourself Back”from the Harvard Business Review.  The authors are Ann Morriss, managing director of the Concire Leadership Institute and Robin Ely and Frances Frei, both professors at the Harvard Business School.

Morriss, Ely, and Frei have been studying for over a decade what gets in the way of ambitious employees who want to step up and lead.  Ely has studied race, gender, and leadership;  Frei has focused on coaching senior executives; and Morriss works on unleashing social entrepreneurs.

Thank You for Doing Your Job

By: Jim Bruce
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In today's reading "Thank You for Doing Your Job", Whitney Johnson argues the value of saying thank you for routine work that contributes to the organization's well being.

Today, there is too little praise or appreciation voiced in our work environments.  In fact, I remember an organization that almost prided itself in being a "praise-free" zone.  Yet genuine gratitude goes a long way to engage people and bind them together, to say nothing about strengthening an building relationships.

Accountability: What Do You Owe Your Direct Reports

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s reading is a short essay, reproduced below, by Roger Schwartz in his newsletter Fundamental Change.  He makes two significant points that caught my attention:  First, accountability is a two-way street.  Not only do your staff have accountability to their manager, but the manager, you, have accountability to them.  And, second, all feedback needs to be timely.  Said differently, it becomes stale very rapidly.  Schwartz suggests that if you have not given the feedback within a week of observing either something good that needs to be recognized or something ineffective that needs to b

How Team Leaders Show Support – or Not

By: Jim Bruce
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For today’s Tuesday Reading, we turn to a Harvard Business School Working Knowledge Q&A – “How Team Leaders Show Support – or Not”– with HBS faculty member Teresa Anabile.

Though from 2004, the findings remain valid.  Professor Anabile’s research points to two key concepts for leaders who want to gain their staff’s confidence:

1.  Perceptions of team leader support are more positive when the leader

     - gives timely feedback

     - support the team member’s actions and decisions

How to Make People Passionate About Their Work

By: Jim Bruce
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For today’s reading we turn to John Baldoni’s blog at the Harvard Business Review for his piece “How to Make People Passionate About Their Work”.  

Baldoni notes that generating passion for what you do is essential, and doubly so in difficult times.  He goes on to say that it is essential for a leader to have passion as it is vital to convincing others that their work matters.

He offers three suggestions for cultivating passion:

How to Identify Employee's Hidden Talents

By: Jim Bruce
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There’s lots of advice on finding and attracting staff and on identifying and retaining top performers you already have.  Stephen DeMaio, in a recent blog entry – “How to Identify Employees’ Hidden Talents” – argues that it is even more important to look for your current staff's hidden strengths to find new skills and talents that have value to the organization.

DeMano suggests four approaches:

How Leaders Get Their Teams To "Click"

By: Jim Bruce
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Well-integrated, high-performing teams, teams that “click,” is the subject of today's Tuesday Reading – “How Leaders Get Their Teams To ‘Click’”  by Phil Harken.  Such teams never lose slight of their goals and are largely self-sustaining.  They often seem to take on a life of their own.  Studies by the European Centre for Organizational Research show that teams that “click” always have a “leader who creates the environment and establishes the operating principles and values that are conducive to high performance.”

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