Change

New Lenses and a Sharper Vision

By: Leadership Part...
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Returning to work after our second session, I felt like I was coming back not just with new tools, but with new lenses and sharper vision.  But would that have an impact?  I think it has.  Here are three mini-reflections focused around new things that happened in my leadership because of lessons and tools I acquired through MOR:

Get on the Balcony

By: Leadership Part...
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Stop Getting in Your Own Way

My big takeaway from our first set of meetings has to be to “get on the balcony.”  Related to getting on the balcony, I recognized through our reading and activities that I need to delegate more, give work back, and say no more.  Once I condition myself to make a habit of doing these things, I will have carved out the time for me to be on the balcony. 

Professional Toolbox

By: Leadership Part...
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A couple of years ago I had my kitchen remodeled.  During the process, I, along with my young boys, reveled in the tools the contractors had at their disposal, and their skill in using them.  They had so many tools - some for general use (hammer) and others more specialized (router) – their truck looked like an aisle at The Home Depot.

MOR's Top Trends

By: Brian McDonald
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For the 2015 MOR Leaders Conference held May 27-28 in Indianapolis Brian McDonald and Jim Bruce collaborated on the following top trends impacting our clients:

1. Globalization of Education

Education is global. Increased numbers of international students, US campuses abroad, countries creating new universities some of which are world-class and attract US students. The list of top universities in the world will change dramatically in the next two decades.

2. Teaching and Learning

Speeding Up On Curves

By: Jim Bruce
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No, today’s Tuesday Reading is not bad driving advice!  The curves here are those Brad Wheeler, Vice President for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer for Indiana University and a professor of information systems in IU’s Kelly School of Business, is speaking of in his January/February 2014 EDUCAUSE Review essay “Speeding Up On Curves” which is our

IMPACT!

By: Jim Bruce
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Today’s reading, IMPACT, was written by Bruce Barton, as a reflection in one of the Leaders Program cycles.  Bruce manages the Shared Development Group of the General Library System at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

 

Something I've been thinking about:

Be Still

By: Jim Bruce
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Last week Mary Jordan’s post on the Linkage Leadership Blog showed up in my Inbox.  She is a Principle Consultant and Co-Leader of the Change and Transition Leadership Practice at Linkage, an international consulting practice focusing on developing organizations.
 

OKR – Objectives and Key Results

By: Jim Bruce
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We began the 2015 Tuesday Readings with a series of readings focused on being intentional.  A week later, we focused on being intentional about developing new practices to strengthen our leadership.  We next focused on the art of saying “NO,” about being intentional in adding to your deliverables.

Your Calendar

By: Jim Bruce
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We began the Tuesday Readings for 2015 with a focus on being intentional, and followed that with an essay on practices and then, last week, on the art of saying “no.”  Today we want to take a next step and turn to your calendar and being intentional about it.  It’s been noted that you have a choice – either you control your calendar or your calendar controls you.  I fear that too often it’s the later when really it should be the former.  You really need to control your calendar to be an effective leader and be intentional about how you use your time.

The Art of Saying "No"

By: Jim Bruce
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Almost everyone I run into bemoans their busyness, the large number of To Do’s that are in front of them, and the seeming inability to make headway in reducing the length of the list.  Author and consultant David Allen suggests that the typical mid-level manager, at any one time, spanning all aspects of his or her life, has 40 – 70 projects (a project being anything that takes more than one step to finish) and 150 – 200 next action steps.  (As an aside, you really do have to have a system – beyond your brain – to manage all this or else items will always get lost.)


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